Tag Archives: osha

QSSP Provide More than Just Personal Protection Equipment

Tanner Safety Talk

What Does QSSP Mean & Why Does that Matter?

The Qualified Safety Sales Professional Program, abbreviated as QSSP, is the industry’s premier training program for safety sales professionals. Sales professionals that have qualifies as a QSSP have broadened their technical expertise in health & safety, gaining a high-caliber understanding of the complex standards & regulations set by OSHA, EPA, and other similar agencies. QSSP members are not only an asset for the companies they work for, but also the customers they serve.

  • Over 1500 sales & marketing representatives in the safety industry are QSSP
  • Developed specifically for safety equipment manufacturer & distributors
  • Instructed by established and well-respected safety professionals

The benefits of a QSSP

  • QSSP have adequately prepared themselves to plan and execute successful safety & illness prevention programsTannerSafetyTalk4
  • QSSP are valued resources to their customers, having the knowledge, competence, credibility, and solution needed
  • QSSP have learned the principles & practices of occupational health & safety
  • QSSP know the fundamentals of industrial hygiene, risk management, safety engineering, health & safety regulations, and workers comp
  • QSSP can study air samples & exposure levels and help with respirator fit testing
  • QSSP can help with fall protection basics, electrical safety, and confined spaces
  • QSSP have been exposed to the full range of safety equipment and safety practices for the workplace
  • QSSP understand OSHA regulations, standard, compliances, and enforcements
  • QSSP know how all the parts of a safety & health program work together
  • QSSP can calculate the costs of an injury & how they affect profits

Why Buy from QSSP?

When buying from a QSSP you know you are working with a professional who has a true understanding of the safety challenges you are facing. You won’t get the standard cookie-cutter safety solution, instead the QSSP will evaluate your specific situation and develop a specialized safety program designs specifically for you. QSSP’s main goals are to help companies identify hazards & controls, participate/run safety meetings & trainings, and #1 provide the protective safety equipment and solutions suited for you and your job site.

Meet Tanner’s Resident QSSP

Tanner is pleased to announce that Patrick Monahan successfully earned his QSSP (Qualified Safety Sales Professional) and OSHA-30 certifications.Tanner Safety Talk

Pat has earned these professional designations to help our customers be prepared in the prevention of worker injuries to their employees.  Pat brings the necessary knowledge, competence, credibility, and solutions to support the mission of helping protect your workers. QSSPs are set apart because they have successfully completed an intensive course on technical and regulatory fundamentals of workplace safety and health sponsored by the International Safety Equipment Association (ISEA). By working with Pat, you are working with a professional who has a real understanding of the challenges employers face, and is armed with creative solutions that go beyond simply filling an order.

Tanner urges all of our customers to examine their current safety program, contact Pat for an evaluation, and if necessary, Pat will create a program that will help drive down incident rates and insurance costs and most importantly, keep your employees safe.

Pat Monahan contact info:

cell #-631-316-3048

pmomahan@tannerbolt.com

Register for Personal Fall Safety, Tool Safety & Rescue Training Programs with Tanner

Proper Safety Precautions WILL Save Money & Lives

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Safety is a Job Everyone Needs to Take Seriously

While working at heights, it is very important to take the proper safety precautions & to use the correct fall protection equipment each and every time. No matter the size of the job, safety should never take a back seat.

Recently the U.S. Department of Labor’s Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) cited Northridge Construction Corp. for failing to provide proper fall protection & protective helmets, ensuring the structural integrity of a roof and the misuse of a ladder. The company now potentially faces $224,620 in penalties.

These potential penalties are the result of an employee suffering fatal injuries after a structure collapsed during the installation of roof panels on a shed. This unfortunate event could have easily been avoided if the proper safety precautions were taken and if the employee was provided the proper fall protection equipment.

“Fall-related fatalities are preventable if employers use required fall protection systems, such as guardrails or personal fall arrest systems. OSHA standards are legal requirements that every employer must follow to ensure workers are protected from serious injuries.” – OSHA Long Island Area Director Anthony Ciuffo.

Tanner Has the Safety Solutions & Equipment You Need

At Tanner safety on the job site is our #1 goal. We have a wide selection of safety equipment available to our customers including: fall protection, tool drop protection, head protection, hand protection, respiratory protection & much more. Please feel free to reach out to us if you need help finding the proper fall protection & safety equipment for your next job. We are also happy to help you with any other safety-related questions you may have – Phone: 800-456-2658 | Email: websales@tannerbolt.com.

Fall Protection Training Available to Our Customers

Tanner & 3M Fall Protection offer fall safety and rescue training programs at your job site. Each training program is specially tailored to your job site and workers. The hands-on training scenarios identify fall protection hazards in and around your facility. By training your employees in their normal work environment, we ensure that the issues discussed are immediately applicable for proper OSHA fall protection training. Flexibility and cost savings are an added bonus when you are considering on-site training. You provide the students and the location, we provide the equipment, experienced instructors and fall protection certification. Please reach out to one of our Tanner customer service reps for more information – Phone: 800-456-2658 | Email: websales@tannerbolt.com.

Stay Safe from Carbon Monoxide Poisoning

Working with an Invisible & Silent Killer on the JobsitecoEngine

This invisible & silent killer is Carbon Monoxide (CO), a poisonous, colorless, odorless & tasteless gas. Carbon Monoxide may be odorless, but often gets mixed with other gases with an odor. Carbon Monoxide is a common industrial hazard, CO is the result of the incomplete burning of material containing carbon such as, natural gas, gasoline, kerosene, oil, propane, coal and wood. One of the most common sources of carbon monoxide exposure on jobsites comes from the internal combustion engine.

How Harmful is Carbon Monoxide

In large amounts, carbon monoxide can overcome you in just minutes, causing you to lose consciousness and suffocate. CO is harmful when breathed in because it displaces the oxygen present in the blood, which deprives the heart, brain and other vital organs of oxygen. Carbon monoxide poisoning is deadly, but can also be reversed if it caught in time. Even if you are lucky enough to recover, acute poisoning may still result in permanent damage to the heart & brain. Significant reproductive risk has also been linked to carbon monoxide poisoning.

What are Common Signs of Carbon Monoxide Poisoning

Symptoms will vary widely from person to person, but will occur sooner in persons most susceptible such as: young children, elderly, people with heart or lung disease, workers at height, smokers & people with elevated CO blood levels. This includes an elevated risk to fetuses.

  • Tightness across the chest
  • Sudden chest pain
  • HeadachecarbonMononxideStopped
  • Fatigue
  • Dizziness
  • Drowsiness
  • Nausea

Prolonged or High Exposure Can Lead to

  • Symptoms worsening
  • Vomiting
  • Confusion
  • Passing out
  • Loss of consciousness
  • Muscle weakness

What Should You Do if You Expect Someone Has Been Poisoned by Carbon Monoxide

  • Immediately move the victim to an open area with fresh air
  • Seek out medical attention/assistance, call 911 or other local emergency number
  • If victim is still breathing, administer 100% oxygen to the victim using a tight-fitting mask
  • If victim has stopped breathing, administer cardiopulmonary resuscitation

Make sure that rescuers are not exposed to dangerous carbon monoxide levels when performing rescue operations.

How Can Employers Help Prevent Carbon Monoxide Poisoning

  • Install an effective ventilation systems that remove CO from work areas
  • Maintain equipment and appliances on a regular basis that can produce CO
  • Consider switching from gasoline-powered equipment to equipment powered by electricity, batteries, or compressed air if possible
  • Prohibit the use of gasoline-powered engines and tools in poorly ventilated areas
  • Provide personal CO monitors with audible alarms if potential exposure to CO exists
  • Test air regularly in areas where CO may be present
  • Use additional self-contained breathing apparatus with proper air supply in areas with high CO concentrations
  • Use respirators with appropriate canisters, in conjunction with personal CO monitoring, for short periods under certain circumstances where CO levels are not exceedingly high
  • Educate workers about the sources and conditions that may result in CO poisoning as well as the symptoms and control of CO exposure
  • If your employees are working in confined spaces where the presence of CO is suspected, you must ensure that workers test for oxygen sufficiency before entering

OSHA Standards for Carbon Monoxide Exposure

  • The OSHA permissible exposure limit (PEL) for CO is 50 parts per million (ppm). OSHA standards prohibit worker exposure to more than 50 parts of CO gas per million parts of air averaged during an 8-hour time period.
  • The 8-hour PEL for CO in maritime operations is also 50 ppm. Maritime workers, however, must be removed from exposure if the CO oncentration in the atmosphere exceeds 100 ppm. The peak CO level for employees engaged in Ro-Ro operations (roll-on rolloff operations during cargo loading and unloading) is 200 ppm.

OSHA Memorandum – Recent Silica Construction Standard

Tanner Does It’s Part, Lends a Helping Hand

Tanner strives to help it’s customers understand and navigate the complexities of the new OSHA Dust Silica requirements through education, training, and availability of products.

Shop with confidence when you purchase from an Authorized Distributor as we always have the latest, most accurate information and conform to strict requirements. Tanner has received a lot of questions and concerns about the most recent policies about Crystalline Silica Dust. The Respirable Crystalline Silica construction standard, known as 29 CFR § 1926.1153, became enforceable on September 23, 2017, and OSHA is visiting active job sites with the intent of compliance.

Please call Danny Epstein or Steve Mattes at Tanner to discuss your job site and concerns you may have – 800-456-2658

Tanner takes a multi-facet approach in helping its clients with efforts focused on informing, education, training and providing the necessary products you need. You may shop for dust compliant products at Tanner by visiting – Dust Compliance Product at Tanner – or typing in the keyword “silica” in our search.

OSHA Launch of Enforcement

Tanner would like to share OSHA’s memorandum about the launch of enforcement of the Respirable Crystalline Silica in Construction Standard, 29 CFR § 1926.1153.

September 20, 2017

MEMORANDUM FOR:
REGIONAL ADMINISTRATORS
FROM:
THOMAS GALASSI
Acting Deputy Assistant Secretary
SUBJECT
Launch of Enforcement of the Respirable Crystalline Silica in Construction Standard, 29 CFR § 1926.1153

The Respirable Crystalline Silica construction standard, 29 CFR § 1926.1153, becomes enforceable on September 23, 2017. The standard establishes a new 8-hour time-weighted average (TWA) Permissible Exposure Limit (PEL) of 50 µg/m3, an action level (AL) of 25 µg/m3, and a host of ancillary requirements.

During the first 30 days of enforcement, OSHA will carefully evaluate good faith efforts taken by employers in their attempts to meet the new construction silica standard. OSHA will render compliance assistance and outreach to assure that covered employers are fully and properly complying with its requirements. Given the novelty of the Table 1 approach, OSHA will pay particular attention to assisting employers in fully and properly implementing the controls in the table. OSHA will assist employers who are making good faith efforts to meet the new requirements to assure understanding and compliance.

If, upon inspection, it appears an employer is not making any efforts to comply, OSHA’s inspection will not only include collection of exposure air monitoring performed in accordance with Agency procedures, but those employers may also be considered for citation. Any proposed citations related to inspections conducted in this time period will require National Office review.

To ensure effective implementation of the new standard, OSHA has developed interim inspection and citation guidance to be released prior to termination of this memorandum. The compliance directive will be finalized thereafter.

Regional offices are advised to contact the Office of Health Enforcement at 202-693-2190 with questions regarding enforcement of the new silica rule.

Stand-Down and Save Lives

Take Time to Talk About Fall Prevention During Nation Safety Stand-Down Week

The leading cause of death for construction employees continues to be falls from elevation. In 2015 fall from elevation accounted for 350 of the 937 construction fatalities. These deaths are preventable if you take the proper safety precautions before working at heights. To help jump start the prevention of these deaths, employers and employees need to get together to take a Safety Stand-Down and talk about Fall Prevention on the jobsite.

What is National Safety Stand-Down Week?

During National Safety Stand-Down Week employers voluntarily take time to talk to their employees about safety on the jobsite. Any workplace can hold a Safety Stand-Down to focus on Fall Hazards and the importance of Fall Prevention. Topics covered in a Safety Stand-Down usually include:

  • Potential hazards on the jobsitesafety-pays_black
  • Fall protection equipment
  • Safety equipment inspections
  • Proper protective practices
  • Company’s safety policies and goals
  • Developing rescue plans

It also gives employees the opportunity to voice any concerns about possible fall hazards and other safety concerns they see.

Who Can Participate in Safety Stand-Down Week?

Safety Stand-Down Week is open for any workplace that wants to participate. Over the years, participants included commercial construction companies, sub and independent contractors, general industry employers, residential construction contractors, highway construction companies, U.S. military, safety equipment manufactures, unions and many more…

Safety Stand Down Logos

It Takes a Group Effort to Make a Change

OSHA has taken the steps to connect and partner with a number of key groups to help make Safety Stand-Down Week a success. These groups include: the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH), the National Occupational Research Agenda (NORA), OSHA approved State Plans, State consultation programs, the Center for Construction Research and Training (CPWR), the American Society of Safety Engineers (ASSE), the National Safety Council, the National Construction Safety Executives (NCSE), the U.S. Air Force, and the OSHA Training Institute (OTI) Education Centers.

Tanner Solutions

Tanner Safety Kits – 5 custom safety kit configurations to choose from that provide you the protection you need.Tanner Solution Logos

Fall Protection by 3M, DBI-SALA® & PROTECTA® – Find everything you need to keep you safe while working at heights.

Tool Drop Prevention by Proto® – Keep your tools safe and secure with Proto® Tether-Ready Tools.

Helpful Links to Make Your Safety Stand-Down a Success

OSHA News Release – National Safety Stand-Down Week

Join the National Safety Stand-Down & Help Prevent Falls in Construction

National Safety Stand-Down Week is a voluntary event for employers to talk to their employees about safety on the jobsite. Safety Stand-Down Week is open to all workplaces and OSHA encourages employers to stand-down and take a break to focus on Fall Hazards and reinforce the importance of Fall Protection. During Safety Stand-Down Week it is a great opportunity for employers to have open conversations with their employees about fall hazards, protection methods, and the company’s safety goals and policies. It is also a great opportunity for employees to talk about potential fall hazards they see on the jobsite.

View, Read & Share OSHA’s News Release about Safety Stand-Down Week Here: OSHA News Release – Safety Stand-Down Week

Safety Stand Down

Removing Snow From Your Roof? Think Twice Before Climbing Up

OSHA Reminder of the Importance of Fall Protection Equipment

Prevent Tragedy When Removing Snow from Rooftops & Elevated Surfaces

As the winter weather worsens and the temperatures drop, there is no time more important than now to ALWAYS use proper fall protection equipment while working at heights. And yes this includes tasks like removing snow and ice from rooftops and elevated surfaces. Not only do you have to deal with working at heights, but the addition of inclement weather posses a number of other safety ricks including: icy surfaces, frigid temperatures, and uncertain dangers under the snow…

“OSHA reminds workers, employers and the public in general to take precautions and to be aware that snow removal can be hazardous. Safety must be a number one priority,” said David Kearns, OSHA’s area director in Boise. “As people work to remove snow from roofs and other elevated surfaces, proper fall protection is essential. With these safeguards, falls are wholly preventable. Despite these warnings, falls remain the leading cause of serious injuries and deaths during snow removal.”

The Best Plan of Action is Always Plan Ahead

Before the snow even starts to accumulate, you should already have a plan of action in place. This plan of action should include what you need to remove the snow safely, safety precautions, and a safe way to remove the snow & ice. Some important questions you should be asking yourself while putting together this plan are:

  • Can the snow / ice be removed from the ground?
  • What areas on the roof could become hidden hazards and pose as safety a threat? (skylights, roof drains, vents…)Roof snow removal
  • What is the best way to remove the snow / ice from the roof to prevent unbalanced loading?
  • What is the maximum load limit of the roof itself? Will it be able to handle the snow / ice, workers, & removal equipment?
  • What fall & personal protection equipment, clothing & tools will you need for the job?
  • Do the workers need any training to remove snow / ice safely?
  • How will the workers & removal equipment be safely brought up to the roof?
  • What precautions will be put in place to protect people on the ground during the removal process?

Always Use the Required Fall Protection Equipment. Every time.

Slips and falls are the leading cause of deaths and severe injuries that occur during snow / ice removal jobs. OSHA has standards in place that require employers to evaluate hazards and protect their workers from falls accordingly. OSHA Standard 1910.23 for workers working at heights of 4 feet or more above a lower level. As well as, OSHA Standard 1926.501 for workers working 6 feet or more for construction work.

In Cases Where Workers Must Access Roofs & Elevated Surfaces to Remove Snow / Ice, BE SURE…Snow removal ppe

  • Workers are trained on the proper use of the fall protection equipment being used and fall hazards. (1910.132(f)(1) and 1926.503(a)(1))
  • Workers are provided and use the proper fall protection equipment when working in area that are not adequately guarded, such as, guardrail systems or covers. (STD 01-01-013 and 1926.501(b))
  • Workers that are wearing personal fall protection equipment properly don their harness and that they are properly secured before accessing the roof.
  • There is a proper plan in place in case a worker is caught by a fall protection system. (1926.502(d)(20))
  • To remove or clearly mark out and potential trip hazards that workers may encounter while working.

Protect Yourself with Only the Best

Now that you know the importance of wearing the proper fall protection and personal protection equipment while removing snow / ice from roofs and elevated surfaces. Its time to get yourself some of the necessary equipment so you can now work safely and effectively. Shop for Safety & PPE products now.

2 harness 1 srl 3 lanyard 4 anchor
 Full Body Harnesses  Self Retracting Lifelines  Lanyards  Anchorage Devices
5 gloves 6 jacket 7 head 8 track
 Cold Weather Gloves  Winter Jackets  Winter Headwear  Ice Traction

OSHA Safety Bulletin – Walking-Working Surfaces & Personal Protective Equipment

OSHA Header

11-17-2016, OSHA Published Final Rule on Walking & Working Surfaces

Who and what does the final rule cover?

The final rule applies to all general industry workplaces and covers all walking-working surfaces, which include horizontal and vertical surfaces such as floors, stairs, roofs, ladders, ramps, scaffolds and elevated walkways. The final rule also has provisions affecting fall protection systems.

Summary:

OSHA is revising and updating its general industry standards on walking-working surfaces to prevent and reduce
workplace slips, trips, and falls, as well as other injuries and fatalities associated with walking-working surface hazards. The final rule includes revised and new provisions addressing, for example, fixed ladders, rope descent systems, fall
protection systems and criteria including personal fall protection systems, and training on fall hazards and fall protection systems. In addition, the final rule adds requirements on the design, performance, and use of personal fall protection systems.

Tanner Resource Center Has it All

To read the full Regulation Summary head on over to the Tanner Resource Center. In the Full Summary you will be able to read information about: Who & What is Covered, Effective / Compliance Dates, & Major Changes giving you a clear understanding of OSHA’s new regulation.

Find OSHA’s Regulation Summary Here

While in Tanner’s Resource Center be sure to check out other great resources like: Product Videos, Tanner White Papers, Catalogs & much more!

 

 

 

Portable Fire Extinguishers – Not Only Essential But OSHA Required On-Site

But Don’t Get Burned – Learn How to Properly Identify & Correctly Use Portable Fire Extinguishers

If a fire ever breaks out on a jobsite your first instinct may be to grab the nearest fire extinguisher to try to put it out. BUT before you do you should know the answers to the following questions.  Not knowing these answers and trying to put the fire out yourself could potentially lead to extensive property damage, personal injury, or even death.

  • Is the fire to large to control with a portable fire extinguisher?
  • Is the fire extinguisher the right type & size for the fire at hand?
  • Do you know the correct sequence of steps to properly use a portable fire extinguisher?

The first thing you must understand about using portable fire extinguishers is they are not intended to be used to put out large fires. They are intended for incipient stage fires only – initial or beginning stage, incipient fires can be handled with a portable fire extinguisher & you have no need for personal protection equipment. If you ever come across a large uncontrollable fire or you do not feel comfortable putting the fire out yourself, be sure to immediately evacuate the area and alert others of the fire.

From proper selection of, understanding the classes and safe use of each class, to knowing the basics on how to properly use an extinguisher using the PASS method. Be sure to read through so you know how to plan and act should you ever find yourself in the company of a fire.

Proper Selection

Before using a fire extinguisher it is important to know what the type(s) of fire the extinguisher is rated for. Some fire extinguishers are only rated for a single type of fire (Class A, Class B, or Class D), but most fire extinguishers are rated for a combination of fires (Class AB, Class BC, Class ABC). Due to these differences it is important to always check the labels on the fire extinguishers before using. It is important to check the size of the fire extinguisher as well to know how long the extinguisher will last before being emptied. Typically small sized extinguishers (5 ABC) will only last 6 – 10 seconds, while larger sized extinguishers (20 ABC) will last around 25 – 35 seconds before being emptied.

Identifying the Correct Fire Extinguisher to Use

Class A Rated

Class A Rated Fire Extinguishers are intended for use on ordinary combustibles: wood, paper, cardboard, dry vegetation, & some plastics. Class A fire extinguishers often contain water so be sure NOT to use on flammable liquid fires or electrical fires.

Class B Ratedfire-extinguisher-ratings

Class B Rated Fire Extinguishers are intended for use on flammable liquids: fuels, paint thinners, solvents, oil, & grease. These CO2 extinguishers displace oxygen so the fire can not continue to burn, but these extinguishers can also displace the oxygen in a small enclosed place, so ONLY use in a well ventilated areas. Also the horn shaped nozzle can become extremely cold, cold enough to cause frostbite, so be extremely careful when using a Class B Fire Extinguisher.

Class C Rated

Class C Rated Fire Extinguishers are intended for use on fires near or involving electrically energized equipment. This designation is typically seen on combination type fire extinguishers, that are suitable on other types of fires as well.

Class D Rated

Class D Rated Fire Extinguishers are intended to be used on fires involving combustible metals that actually burn, such as: magnesium, sodium, & potassium.

Class K Rated

Class K Rated Fire Extinguishers, the newest type on the market, are specialty extinguishers that are intended to be used on kitchen / deep fryer fires: animal oils, fats, & vegetable oils.

Effectively Use a Fire Extinguisher with the PASS Method

It’s important to use a fire extinguisher rated for the type of fire you’re dealing with, but its just as important to know how to properly use the fire extinguisher. There are (4) basic step to properly use a portable fire extinguisher. However people often panic when seeing a fire and forget what to do. To help remember the (4) basic steps of using a fire extinguisher, just remember P A S S.

  • P. Pull the pin out of the handle pass
  • A. Aim the nozzle at the base of the fire
  • S. Squeeze the handle to discharge the fire extinguisher
  • S. Sweep from side to side to help cover all the burning material

Do’s & Don’ts

  • Maintain a safe escape path
  • Retreat immediately if conditions get out of control
  • Watch for flare-ups afterwards
  • Beware of slippery floors
  • Watch for unstable structures and objects
  • Recharge ALL used extinguishers

OSHA Regulations

In closing, proper fire extinguisher use isn’t just something that’s good to plan for, but necessary to keep employers and employees safe. It is also both required and regulated by OSHA and as such should become part of your OSHA safety plan at work.

While there are many standards for a variety of industries regulated by OSHA, the primary regulations for construction and general industry are found in two sections that we think would be beneficial to leave you with.

1926.150

The employer shall be responsible for the development of a fire protection program to be followed throughout all phases of the construction and demolition work, and he shall provide for the firefighting equipment as specified in this subpart. As fire hazards occur, there shall be no delay in providing the necessary equipment.

1910.157

Where the employer has provided portable fire extinguishers for employee use in the workplace, the employer shall also provide an educational program to familiarize employees with the general principles of fire extinguisher use and the hazards involved with incipient stage fire fighting.” Hands on experience using actual fires in a controlled environment is not required in your particular case.

The Importance of Pre-Operational Lifting & Rigging Safety Inspections

Safety Standards and Regulations

Tanner along with Columbus McKinnon want to be sure you know the importance and understand all of the safety regulations that apply to your lifting and rigging systems. Each piece of equipment that you use in your lifting & rigging system may have different standards that apply. This may cause confusion and leave you vulnerable to citations and fines. This makes it very important to read up on all available literature to make sure you are following all required guidelines and standards.

Overview of the Most Important ASME Safety Standards

On parts and equipment where OSHA regulations do not apply, CM looks to ASME to provide them with safety standards to follow.

ASME is an organization that provides design and inspection standards for hoists and rigging products. ASME is a voluntary committee made up of industry experts. Their standards are voluntary standards updated every three years – not laws like OSHA regulations. Standards are used as guidance for safety because many of our products do not have applicable OSHA regulations.

ASME B30.16 Standard

This standard applies to under hung powered hoists, including electric and air, as well as chainfalls. This standard covers construction, marking, inspection, use, and training.

ASME B30.21 Standard

This standard applies to lever hoists, including chain, wire rope and strap hoists.

Multiple Regulations for Hoists and Full Lifting Systems

Times where it is very important to read up on your AMSE standards are when, a single hoist has multiple standards that need to be followed or when using a full lifting system. In each of these instances, whether you are an operator or inspector there are specific part of these standards you should know in detail. In any case where you may have a question about any standard, the best practice would be to check with the equipment manufacturer. In these cases Columbus McKinnon is more than happy to help! CMCO’s professional training department offers you extensive training courses to provide in depth training on these regulations.

Columbus McKinnon at Tanner

Tanner chooses to distribute Columbus McKinnon products due to their high manufacturing standards and ability to provide our customers with the highest quality lifting and rigging products. We carry everything you’ll need including: hand chain hoists, electric chain hoists, & ratchet hoists. Along with a large selection of lifting and rigging hardware: wire rope clips, anchor & chain shackles, lifting hooks, and chain. For all of your lifting and rigging needs, be sure to shop Columbus McKinnon at TannerBolt.com

Emergency Shower & Eyewash Station Requirements Per ANSI/ISEA Z358.1-2009 Standard

In our last blog post we talked about Occupational Safety and Health Administration’s (OSHA) regulations in regards to Emergency Showers & Eye Wash Stations. We also introduced American National Standards Institute’s (ANSI) standards that cover all situations where employees are exposed to hazardous materials. These regulations help employers select and install the correct emergency equipment that meets OSHA requirements. In this blog post we will expand upon and list out specific Emergency Shower and Eyewash Station requirements listed in the ANSI/ISEA Z358.1-2009 standard.

Emergency Shower Requirements

Plumbed Shower: An emergency shower permanently connected to a source of potable water
Self-Contained Shower: A shower that contains its own flushing fluid, and must be refilled or replaced after use

The specifications below are for plumbed showers only.
  • HeadsEmergency Shower Sign
    • Positioned 82″—96″ from floor
    • Spray pattern will have a minimum diameter of 20″ at 60″ above the floor
    • Flow Rate=20 gallons per minute (GPM) at 30 pounds per square inch (PSI)
    • The center of the spray pattern shall be located at least 16 inches from any obstruction
  • Valves
    • Activate in 1 second or less
    • Stay-open valve (no use of hands)
    • Valve remains on until the user shuts it off
  • Installation
    • Emergency Shower shall be located in an area that requires no more than 10 seconds to reach.
      • *Consult a medical professional to determine the appropriate distance for harsh acids and caustics (high hazard=closer distance)
    • Shower location shall be in a well-lit area and identified with a sign
    • Shower shall be located on the same level as the hazard
  • Maintenance and Training
    • Plumbed emergency showers will be activated weekly to verify correct operation
    • All employees who might be exposed to a chemical splash shall be trained in the use of the equipment
    • All showers shall be inspected annually to make sure they meet with ANSI Z358.1 requirements

Eye Wash Station Requirements

Plumbed Eye Wash Station: An eye wash unit permanently connected to a source of potable water
Gravity-Feed Eye Wash Station: An eye wash device that contains its own flushing fluid and must be refilled or replaced after use

  • HeadsPortable 16 Gallon Eyewash Station
    • Positioned 33″—45″ from floor
    • Positioned 6″ from wall or nearest obstruction
    • 0.4 gallons per minute (GPM) for 15 minutes for plumbed units shall provide flushing fluid at 30 PSI
    • 0.4 gallons per minute (GPM) for 15 minutes for gravity-feed units
  • Valves
    • Activate in 1 second or less
    • Stay-open valve (leaving hands free)
  • Installation
    • Eye wash station shall be located in an area that requires no more than 10 seconds to reach.
      • *Consult a medical professional to determine the appropriate distance for harsh acids and caustics (high hazard=closer distance)
    • The location of the eye wash station shall be in a well-lit area and identified with a sign
    • Eye wash stations shall be on the same level as the hazard
  • Maintenance and Training
    • A plumbed eye wash station shall be activated weekly to verify proper operation
    • Gravity-feed units shall be maintained according to the manufacturer’s instructions
    • All employees who might be exposed to a chemical splash shall be trained in the use of the equipment
    • All eye/face wash stations shall be inspected annually to make sure they meet ANSI Z358.1 requirements

Eye/Face Wash Station Requirements

An Eye/Face Wash Station is a device used to irrigate and flush both the face and the eyes.

  • Heads
    • Positioned 33″—45″ from floor
    • 6″ from wall or nearest obstruction
    • Large heads to cover both eyes and face or regular size eye wash heads plus a face spray ringFace Eyewash Station
    • 3 gallons per minute (GPM) for 15 minutes
  • Valves
    • Activate in 1 second or less
    • Stay-open valve (leaving hands free)
  • Installation
    • Eye/face wash shall be located in an area that requires no more than 10 seconds to reach.
      • *Consult a medical professional to determine the appropriate distance for harsh acids and caustics (high hazard=closer distance)
    • The location of the eye/face wash station shall be in a well-lit area and identified with a sign
    • Eye/face wash stations shall be on the same level as the hazard
  • Maintenance and Training
    • A plumbed eye/face wash station shall be activated weekly to verify proper operation
    • Gravity-feed units shall be maintained according to the manufacturer’s instructions
    • All employees who might be exposed to a chemical splash shall be trained in the use of the equipment
    • All eye/face wash stations shall be inspected annually to make sure they meet ANSI Z358.1 requirements

Personal Eye Wash and Eyesaline Requirements

A Personal Eye Wash is a supplementary eye wash that supports plumbed units, gravity-feed units, or both by delivering immediate flushing fluid. Personal eye wash units can provide immediate flushing when they are located near the workstations. Personal eye wash equipment does not meet the requirements of plumbed or gravity-feed eye wash equipment. Personal eye wash units can support plumbed or gravity-feed eye wash units, but cannot be a substitute. Personal eye wash can be delivered through bottles of saline solution designed to simulate human tears. Individual bottles can be carried by workers and provide relief in the crucial seconds until an approved eye wash station installation can be reached.

Personal Eye Wash and Eyesaline Available at Tanner

Drench Hose Requirements

A drench hose is a flexible hose connected to a water supply and used to irrigate and flush eyes, face and body areas. Hand-held drench hoses support shower and eyewash units but shall not replace them according to the ANSI standards.

  • HeadsDrench Hose
    • 3 gallons per minute (GPM)
  • Valve
    • Activate in 1 second or less
  • Installation
    • Assemble per the manufacturer’s instructions
    • The location of the drench hose shall be in a well-lit area and identified with a sign
  • Maintenance and Training
    • Activate each drench hose weekly to verify proper operation
    • All employees who might be exposed to a chemical splash shall be trained in the use of the equipment
    • All drench hose equipment shall be inspected annually to make sure they meet ANSI Z358.1 requirements