Tag Archives: osha regulations

OSHA Memorandum – Recent Silica Construction Standard

Tanner Does It’s Part, Lends a Helping Hand

Tanner strives to help it’s customers understand and navigate the complexities of the new OSHA Dust Silica requirements through education, training, and availability of products.

Shop with confidence when you purchase from an Authorized Distributor as we always have the latest, most accurate information and conform to strict requirements. Tanner has received a lot of questions and concerns about the most recent policies about Crystalline Silica Dust. The Respirable Crystalline Silica construction standard, known as 29 CFR § 1926.1153, became enforceable on September 23, 2017, and OSHA is visiting active job sites with the intent of compliance.

Please call Danny Epstein or Steve Mattes at Tanner to discuss your job site and concerns you may have – 800-456-2658

Tanner takes a multi-facet approach in helping its clients with efforts focused on informing, education, training and providing the necessary products you need. You may shop for dust compliant products at Tanner by visiting – Dust Compliance Product at Tanner – or typing in the keyword “silica” in our search.

OSHA Launch of Enforcement

Tanner would like to share OSHA’s memorandum about the launch of enforcement of the Respirable Crystalline Silica in Construction Standard, 29 CFR § 1926.1153.

September 20, 2017

MEMORANDUM FOR:
REGIONAL ADMINISTRATORS
FROM:
THOMAS GALASSI
Acting Deputy Assistant Secretary
SUBJECT
Launch of Enforcement of the Respirable Crystalline Silica in Construction Standard, 29 CFR § 1926.1153

The Respirable Crystalline Silica construction standard, 29 CFR § 1926.1153, becomes enforceable on September 23, 2017. The standard establishes a new 8-hour time-weighted average (TWA) Permissible Exposure Limit (PEL) of 50 µg/m3, an action level (AL) of 25 µg/m3, and a host of ancillary requirements.

During the first 30 days of enforcement, OSHA will carefully evaluate good faith efforts taken by employers in their attempts to meet the new construction silica standard. OSHA will render compliance assistance and outreach to assure that covered employers are fully and properly complying with its requirements. Given the novelty of the Table 1 approach, OSHA will pay particular attention to assisting employers in fully and properly implementing the controls in the table. OSHA will assist employers who are making good faith efforts to meet the new requirements to assure understanding and compliance.

If, upon inspection, it appears an employer is not making any efforts to comply, OSHA’s inspection will not only include collection of exposure air monitoring performed in accordance with Agency procedures, but those employers may also be considered for citation. Any proposed citations related to inspections conducted in this time period will require National Office review.

To ensure effective implementation of the new standard, OSHA has developed interim inspection and citation guidance to be released prior to termination of this memorandum. The compliance directive will be finalized thereafter.

Regional offices are advised to contact the Office of Health Enforcement at 202-693-2190 with questions regarding enforcement of the new silica rule.

Removing Snow From Your Roof? Think Twice Before Climbing Up

OSHA Reminder of the Importance of Fall Protection Equipment

Prevent Tragedy When Removing Snow from Rooftops & Elevated Surfaces

As the winter weather worsens and the temperatures drop, there is no time more important than now to ALWAYS use proper fall protection equipment while working at heights. And yes this includes tasks like removing snow and ice from rooftops and elevated surfaces. Not only do you have to deal with working at heights, but the addition of inclement weather posses a number of other safety ricks including: icy surfaces, frigid temperatures, and uncertain dangers under the snow…

“OSHA reminds workers, employers and the public in general to take precautions and to be aware that snow removal can be hazardous. Safety must be a number one priority,” said David Kearns, OSHA’s area director in Boise. “As people work to remove snow from roofs and other elevated surfaces, proper fall protection is essential. With these safeguards, falls are wholly preventable. Despite these warnings, falls remain the leading cause of serious injuries and deaths during snow removal.”

The Best Plan of Action is Always Plan Ahead

Before the snow even starts to accumulate, you should already have a plan of action in place. This plan of action should include what you need to remove the snow safely, safety precautions, and a safe way to remove the snow & ice. Some important questions you should be asking yourself while putting together this plan are:

  • Can the snow / ice be removed from the ground?
  • What areas on the roof could become hidden hazards and pose as safety a threat? (skylights, roof drains, vents…)Roof snow removal
  • What is the best way to remove the snow / ice from the roof to prevent unbalanced loading?
  • What is the maximum load limit of the roof itself? Will it be able to handle the snow / ice, workers, & removal equipment?
  • What fall & personal protection equipment, clothing & tools will you need for the job?
  • Do the workers need any training to remove snow / ice safely?
  • How will the workers & removal equipment be safely brought up to the roof?
  • What precautions will be put in place to protect people on the ground during the removal process?

Always Use the Required Fall Protection Equipment. Every time.

Slips and falls are the leading cause of deaths and severe injuries that occur during snow / ice removal jobs. OSHA has standards in place that require employers to evaluate hazards and protect their workers from falls accordingly. OSHA Standard 1910.23 for workers working at heights of 4 feet or more above a lower level. As well as, OSHA Standard 1926.501 for workers working 6 feet or more for construction work.

In Cases Where Workers Must Access Roofs & Elevated Surfaces to Remove Snow / Ice, BE SURE…Snow removal ppe

  • Workers are trained on the proper use of the fall protection equipment being used and fall hazards. (1910.132(f)(1) and 1926.503(a)(1))
  • Workers are provided and use the proper fall protection equipment when working in area that are not adequately guarded, such as, guardrail systems or covers. (STD 01-01-013 and 1926.501(b))
  • Workers that are wearing personal fall protection equipment properly don their harness and that they are properly secured before accessing the roof.
  • There is a proper plan in place in case a worker is caught by a fall protection system. (1926.502(d)(20))
  • To remove or clearly mark out and potential trip hazards that workers may encounter while working.

Protect Yourself with Only the Best

Now that you know the importance of wearing the proper fall protection and personal protection equipment while removing snow / ice from roofs and elevated surfaces. Its time to get yourself some of the necessary equipment so you can now work safely and effectively. Shop for Safety & PPE products now.

2 harness 1 srl 3 lanyard 4 anchor
 Full Body Harnesses  Self Retracting Lifelines  Lanyards  Anchorage Devices
5 gloves 6 jacket 7 head 8 track
 Cold Weather Gloves  Winter Jackets  Winter Headwear  Ice Traction

OSHA Safety Bulletin – Walking-Working Surfaces & Personal Protective Equipment

OSHA Header

11-17-2016, OSHA Published Final Rule on Walking & Working Surfaces

Who and what does the final rule cover?

The final rule applies to all general industry workplaces and covers all walking-working surfaces, which include horizontal and vertical surfaces such as floors, stairs, roofs, ladders, ramps, scaffolds and elevated walkways. The final rule also has provisions affecting fall protection systems.

Summary:

OSHA is revising and updating its general industry standards on walking-working surfaces to prevent and reduce
workplace slips, trips, and falls, as well as other injuries and fatalities associated with walking-working surface hazards. The final rule includes revised and new provisions addressing, for example, fixed ladders, rope descent systems, fall
protection systems and criteria including personal fall protection systems, and training on fall hazards and fall protection systems. In addition, the final rule adds requirements on the design, performance, and use of personal fall protection systems.

Tanner Resource Center Has it All

To read the full Regulation Summary head on over to the Tanner Resource Center. In the Full Summary you will be able to read information about: Who & What is Covered, Effective / Compliance Dates, & Major Changes giving you a clear understanding of OSHA’s new regulation.

Find OSHA’s Regulation Summary Here

While in Tanner’s Resource Center be sure to check out other great resources like: Product Videos, Tanner White Papers, Catalogs & much more!

 

 

 

Portable Fire Extinguishers – Not Only Essential But OSHA Required On-Site

But Don’t Get Burned – Learn How to Properly Identify & Correctly Use Portable Fire Extinguishers

If a fire ever breaks out on a jobsite your first instinct may be to grab the nearest fire extinguisher to try to put it out. BUT before you do you should know the answers to the following questions.  Not knowing these answers and trying to put the fire out yourself could potentially lead to extensive property damage, personal injury, or even death.

  • Is the fire to large to control with a portable fire extinguisher?
  • Is the fire extinguisher the right type & size for the fire at hand?
  • Do you know the correct sequence of steps to properly use a portable fire extinguisher?

The first thing you must understand about using portable fire extinguishers is they are not intended to be used to put out large fires. They are intended for incipient stage fires only – initial or beginning stage, incipient fires can be handled with a portable fire extinguisher & you have no need for personal protection equipment. If you ever come across a large uncontrollable fire or you do not feel comfortable putting the fire out yourself, be sure to immediately evacuate the area and alert others of the fire.

From proper selection of, understanding the classes and safe use of each class, to knowing the basics on how to properly use an extinguisher using the PASS method. Be sure to read through so you know how to plan and act should you ever find yourself in the company of a fire.

Proper Selection

Before using a fire extinguisher it is important to know what the type(s) of fire the extinguisher is rated for. Some fire extinguishers are only rated for a single type of fire (Class A, Class B, or Class D), but most fire extinguishers are rated for a combination of fires (Class AB, Class BC, Class ABC). Due to these differences it is important to always check the labels on the fire extinguishers before using. It is important to check the size of the fire extinguisher as well to know how long the extinguisher will last before being emptied. Typically small sized extinguishers (5 ABC) will only last 6 – 10 seconds, while larger sized extinguishers (20 ABC) will last around 25 – 35 seconds before being emptied.

Identifying the Correct Fire Extinguisher to Use

Class A Rated

Class A Rated Fire Extinguishers are intended for use on ordinary combustibles: wood, paper, cardboard, dry vegetation, & some plastics. Class A fire extinguishers often contain water so be sure NOT to use on flammable liquid fires or electrical fires.

Class B Ratedfire-extinguisher-ratings

Class B Rated Fire Extinguishers are intended for use on flammable liquids: fuels, paint thinners, solvents, oil, & grease. These CO2 extinguishers displace oxygen so the fire can not continue to burn, but these extinguishers can also displace the oxygen in a small enclosed place, so ONLY use in a well ventilated areas. Also the horn shaped nozzle can become extremely cold, cold enough to cause frostbite, so be extremely careful when using a Class B Fire Extinguisher.

Class C Rated

Class C Rated Fire Extinguishers are intended for use on fires near or involving electrically energized equipment. This designation is typically seen on combination type fire extinguishers, that are suitable on other types of fires as well.

Class D Rated

Class D Rated Fire Extinguishers are intended to be used on fires involving combustible metals that actually burn, such as: magnesium, sodium, & potassium.

Class K Rated

Class K Rated Fire Extinguishers, the newest type on the market, are specialty extinguishers that are intended to be used on kitchen / deep fryer fires: animal oils, fats, & vegetable oils.

Effectively Use a Fire Extinguisher with the PASS Method

It’s important to use a fire extinguisher rated for the type of fire you’re dealing with, but its just as important to know how to properly use the fire extinguisher. There are (4) basic step to properly use a portable fire extinguisher. However people often panic when seeing a fire and forget what to do. To help remember the (4) basic steps of using a fire extinguisher, just remember P A S S.

  • P. Pull the pin out of the handle pass
  • A. Aim the nozzle at the base of the fire
  • S. Squeeze the handle to discharge the fire extinguisher
  • S. Sweep from side to side to help cover all the burning material

Do’s & Don’ts

  • Maintain a safe escape path
  • Retreat immediately if conditions get out of control
  • Watch for flare-ups afterwards
  • Beware of slippery floors
  • Watch for unstable structures and objects
  • Recharge ALL used extinguishers

OSHA Regulations

In closing, proper fire extinguisher use isn’t just something that’s good to plan for, but necessary to keep employers and employees safe. It is also both required and regulated by OSHA and as such should become part of your OSHA safety plan at work.

While there are many standards for a variety of industries regulated by OSHA, the primary regulations for construction and general industry are found in two sections that we think would be beneficial to leave you with.

1926.150

The employer shall be responsible for the development of a fire protection program to be followed throughout all phases of the construction and demolition work, and he shall provide for the firefighting equipment as specified in this subpart. As fire hazards occur, there shall be no delay in providing the necessary equipment.

1910.157

Where the employer has provided portable fire extinguishers for employee use in the workplace, the employer shall also provide an educational program to familiarize employees with the general principles of fire extinguisher use and the hazards involved with incipient stage fire fighting.” Hands on experience using actual fires in a controlled environment is not required in your particular case.