Category Archives: Safety

Celebrate the Holiday, Shop USA Made Products from Tanner

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Shop, Build, Thrive with American Made Products

With the 4th of July right around the corner, there is no better time than now to celebrate this great country and shop for American made products. Most consumers when given the choice, would choose to buy American made products due to a number of factors. When you buy American made products, you are helping to support local businesses, contributing to domestic job growth and keeping American manufacturing strong in the global economy. Along with all of this, most of this time you will be buying a superior product when compared to imports.

Proud to Carry USA Made Products

Tanner is proud to carry an extensive number of USA made products, due to their exceptional quality and high performance. With such a wide variety of products to choose from, our customers are sure to find a number of American made tools, fasteners & industrial supplies for all of their needs. To help celebrate the 4th of July we have decided to help our customers easily find and shop for some of our best selling USA made products. Read on to find a wide selection of USA made fasteners, abrasives, cutting tools, hand tools, safety equipment and much more.

Shop Some of Our Top American Made Products at Tanner

Below are some of our best selling American made products, when shopping TannerBolt.com look for the banner below to identify our USA Made products.

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USA Made Fasteners

USA Made Anchors

USA Made Abrasives

USA Made Saw Blades

USA Made Lifting & Rigging Products

USA Made Hand Tools

USA Made Safety Equipment

 

Stand-Down and Save Lives

Take Time to Talk About Fall Prevention During Nation Safety Stand-Down Week

The leading cause of death for construction employees continues to be falls from elevation. In 2015 fall from elevation accounted for 350 of the 937 construction fatalities. These deaths are preventable if you take the proper safety precautions before working at heights. To help jump start the prevention of these deaths, employers and employees need to get together to take a Safety Stand-Down and talk about Fall Prevention on the jobsite.

What is National Safety Stand-Down Week?

During National Safety Stand-Down Week employers voluntarily take time to talk to their employees about safety on the jobsite. Any workplace can hold a Safety Stand-Down to focus on Fall Hazards and the importance of Fall Prevention. Topics covered in a Safety Stand-Down usually include:

  • Potential hazards on the jobsitesafety-pays_black
  • Fall protection equipment
  • Safety equipment inspections
  • Proper protective practices
  • Company’s safety policies and goals
  • Developing rescue plans

It also gives employees the opportunity to voice any concerns about possible fall hazards and other safety concerns they see.

Who Can Participate in Safety Stand-Down Week?

Safety Stand-Down Week is open for any workplace that wants to participate. Over the years, participants included commercial construction companies, sub and independent contractors, general industry employers, residential construction contractors, highway construction companies, U.S. military, safety equipment manufactures, unions and many more…

Safety Stand Down Logos

It Takes a Group Effort to Make a Change

OSHA has taken the steps to connect and partner with a number of key groups to help make Safety Stand-Down Week a success. These groups include: the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH), the National Occupational Research Agenda (NORA), OSHA approved State Plans, State consultation programs, the Center for Construction Research and Training (CPWR), the American Society of Safety Engineers (ASSE), the National Safety Council, the National Construction Safety Executives (NCSE), the U.S. Air Force, and the OSHA Training Institute (OTI) Education Centers.

Tanner Solutions

Tanner Safety Kits – 5 custom safety kit configurations to choose from that provide you the protection you need.Tanner Solution Logos

Fall Protection by 3M, DBI-SALA® & PROTECTA® – Find everything you need to keep you safe while working at heights.

Tool Drop Prevention by Proto® – Keep your tools safe and secure with Proto® Tether-Ready Tools.

Helpful Links to Make Your Safety Stand-Down a Success

OSHA News Release – National Safety Stand-Down Week

Join the National Safety Stand-Down & Help Prevent Falls in Construction

National Safety Stand-Down Week is a voluntary event for employers to talk to their employees about safety on the jobsite. Safety Stand-Down Week is open to all workplaces and OSHA encourages employers to stand-down and take a break to focus on Fall Hazards and reinforce the importance of Fall Protection. During Safety Stand-Down Week it is a great opportunity for employers to have open conversations with their employees about fall hazards, protection methods, and the company’s safety goals and policies. It is also a great opportunity for employees to talk about potential fall hazards they see on the jobsite.

View, Read & Share OSHA’s News Release about Safety Stand-Down Week Here: OSHA News Release – Safety Stand-Down Week

Safety Stand Down

Save More than Just Money with these NEW Tanner Safety Kits

The latest Tanner Safety Kits have been released and are ready to save you money and prevent injury.  With 5 options to choose from, we are sure you’ll find the configuration that best suits your safety needs. Shop for Tanner’s Money Saving Safety Kits Here.

Tanner Fall Protection Safety Kit #1SafetyKit1

  • WER H412002 – WERNER® BaseWear Harness
  • WER C411100 – WERNER® 6 ft DeCoil Double Leg Lanyard
  • CAP AD111A – 11′ Protecta SRL
  • WER K120002 – WERNER® Backpack

Tanner Fall Protection Safety Kit #2

  • WER H412002 – WERNER® BaseWear Harness
  • WER C411100 – WERNER® 6 ft DeCoil Double Leg Lanyard
  • WER K120002 – WERNER® Backpack

Tanner Fall Protection Safety Kit #3

  • WER H412002 – WERNER® BaseWear Harness
  • WER C311100 – WERNER® 6 ft. DeCoil Single Leg Lanyard
  • WER K120002 – WERNER® BackpackSafetyKit2

Tanner Fall Protection Safety Kit #4

  • WER H412002 – WERNER® BaseWear Harness
  • CAP AD111A – 11 ft. Rebel Self Retracting Lifeline
  • WER K120002 – WERNER® Backpack

Tanner Fall Protection Safety Kit #5

  • WER H412002 – WERNER® BaseWear Harness
  • WER C311100 – WERNER® 6 ft. DeCoil Single Leg Lanyard
  • CAP AD111A – 11 ft. Rebel Self Retracting Lifeline
  • WER K120002 – WERNER® Backpack

TannerSafetyKits

Removing Snow From Your Roof? Think Twice Before Climbing Up

OSHA Reminder of the Importance of Fall Protection Equipment

Prevent Tragedy When Removing Snow from Rooftops & Elevated Surfaces

As the winter weather worsens and the temperatures drop, there is no time more important than now to ALWAYS use proper fall protection equipment while working at heights. And yes this includes tasks like removing snow and ice from rooftops and elevated surfaces. Not only do you have to deal with working at heights, but the addition of inclement weather posses a number of other safety ricks including: icy surfaces, frigid temperatures, and uncertain dangers under the snow…

“OSHA reminds workers, employers and the public in general to take precautions and to be aware that snow removal can be hazardous. Safety must be a number one priority,” said David Kearns, OSHA’s area director in Boise. “As people work to remove snow from roofs and other elevated surfaces, proper fall protection is essential. With these safeguards, falls are wholly preventable. Despite these warnings, falls remain the leading cause of serious injuries and deaths during snow removal.”

The Best Plan of Action is Always Plan Ahead

Before the snow even starts to accumulate, you should already have a plan of action in place. This plan of action should include what you need to remove the snow safely, safety precautions, and a safe way to remove the snow & ice. Some important questions you should be asking yourself while putting together this plan are:

  • Can the snow / ice be removed from the ground?
  • What areas on the roof could become hidden hazards and pose as safety a threat? (skylights, roof drains, vents…)Roof snow removal
  • What is the best way to remove the snow / ice from the roof to prevent unbalanced loading?
  • What is the maximum load limit of the roof itself? Will it be able to handle the snow / ice, workers, & removal equipment?
  • What fall & personal protection equipment, clothing & tools will you need for the job?
  • Do the workers need any training to remove snow / ice safely?
  • How will the workers & removal equipment be safely brought up to the roof?
  • What precautions will be put in place to protect people on the ground during the removal process?

Always Use the Required Fall Protection Equipment. Every time.

Slips and falls are the leading cause of deaths and severe injuries that occur during snow / ice removal jobs. OSHA has standards in place that require employers to evaluate hazards and protect their workers from falls accordingly. OSHA Standard 1910.23 for workers working at heights of 4 feet or more above a lower level. As well as, OSHA Standard 1926.501 for workers working 6 feet or more for construction work.

In Cases Where Workers Must Access Roofs & Elevated Surfaces to Remove Snow / Ice, BE SURE…Snow removal ppe

  • Workers are trained on the proper use of the fall protection equipment being used and fall hazards. (1910.132(f)(1) and 1926.503(a)(1))
  • Workers are provided and use the proper fall protection equipment when working in area that are not adequately guarded, such as, guardrail systems or covers. (STD 01-01-013 and 1926.501(b))
  • Workers that are wearing personal fall protection equipment properly don their harness and that they are properly secured before accessing the roof.
  • There is a proper plan in place in case a worker is caught by a fall protection system. (1926.502(d)(20))
  • To remove or clearly mark out and potential trip hazards that workers may encounter while working.

Protect Yourself with Only the Best

Now that you know the importance of wearing the proper fall protection and personal protection equipment while removing snow / ice from roofs and elevated surfaces. Its time to get yourself some of the necessary equipment so you can now work safely and effectively. Shop for Safety & PPE products now.

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 Full Body Harnesses  Self Retracting Lifelines  Lanyards  Anchorage Devices
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 Cold Weather Gloves  Winter Jackets  Winter Headwear  Ice Traction

OSHA Safety Bulletin – Walking-Working Surfaces & Personal Protective Equipment

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11-17-2016, OSHA Published Final Rule on Walking & Working Surfaces

Who and what does the final rule cover?

The final rule applies to all general industry workplaces and covers all walking-working surfaces, which include horizontal and vertical surfaces such as floors, stairs, roofs, ladders, ramps, scaffolds and elevated walkways. The final rule also has provisions affecting fall protection systems.

Summary:

OSHA is revising and updating its general industry standards on walking-working surfaces to prevent and reduce
workplace slips, trips, and falls, as well as other injuries and fatalities associated with walking-working surface hazards. The final rule includes revised and new provisions addressing, for example, fixed ladders, rope descent systems, fall
protection systems and criteria including personal fall protection systems, and training on fall hazards and fall protection systems. In addition, the final rule adds requirements on the design, performance, and use of personal fall protection systems.

Tanner Resource Center Has it All

To read the full Regulation Summary head on over to the Tanner Resource Center. In the Full Summary you will be able to read information about: Who & What is Covered, Effective / Compliance Dates, & Major Changes giving you a clear understanding of OSHA’s new regulation.

Find OSHA’s Regulation Summary Here

While in Tanner’s Resource Center be sure to check out other great resources like: Product Videos, Tanner White Papers, Catalogs & much more!

 

 

 

Portable Fire Extinguishers – Not Only Essential But OSHA Required On-Site

But Don’t Get Burned – Learn How to Properly Identify & Correctly Use Portable Fire Extinguishers

If a fire ever breaks out on a jobsite your first instinct may be to grab the nearest fire extinguisher to try to put it out. BUT before you do you should know the answers to the following questions.  Not knowing these answers and trying to put the fire out yourself could potentially lead to extensive property damage, personal injury, or even death.

  • Is the fire to large to control with a portable fire extinguisher?
  • Is the fire extinguisher the right type & size for the fire at hand?
  • Do you know the correct sequence of steps to properly use a portable fire extinguisher?

The first thing you must understand about using portable fire extinguishers is they are not intended to be used to put out large fires. They are intended for incipient stage fires only – initial or beginning stage, incipient fires can be handled with a portable fire extinguisher & you have no need for personal protection equipment. If you ever come across a large uncontrollable fire or you do not feel comfortable putting the fire out yourself, be sure to immediately evacuate the area and alert others of the fire.

From proper selection of, understanding the classes and safe use of each class, to knowing the basics on how to properly use an extinguisher using the PASS method. Be sure to read through so you know how to plan and act should you ever find yourself in the company of a fire.

Proper Selection

Before using a fire extinguisher it is important to know what the type(s) of fire the extinguisher is rated for. Some fire extinguishers are only rated for a single type of fire (Class A, Class B, or Class D), but most fire extinguishers are rated for a combination of fires (Class AB, Class BC, Class ABC). Due to these differences it is important to always check the labels on the fire extinguishers before using. It is important to check the size of the fire extinguisher as well to know how long the extinguisher will last before being emptied. Typically small sized extinguishers (5 ABC) will only last 6 – 10 seconds, while larger sized extinguishers (20 ABC) will last around 25 – 35 seconds before being emptied.

Identifying the Correct Fire Extinguisher to Use

Class A Rated

Class A Rated Fire Extinguishers are intended for use on ordinary combustibles: wood, paper, cardboard, dry vegetation, & some plastics. Class A fire extinguishers often contain water so be sure NOT to use on flammable liquid fires or electrical fires.

Class B Ratedfire-extinguisher-ratings

Class B Rated Fire Extinguishers are intended for use on flammable liquids: fuels, paint thinners, solvents, oil, & grease. These CO2 extinguishers displace oxygen so the fire can not continue to burn, but these extinguishers can also displace the oxygen in a small enclosed place, so ONLY use in a well ventilated areas. Also the horn shaped nozzle can become extremely cold, cold enough to cause frostbite, so be extremely careful when using a Class B Fire Extinguisher.

Class C Rated

Class C Rated Fire Extinguishers are intended for use on fires near or involving electrically energized equipment. This designation is typically seen on combination type fire extinguishers, that are suitable on other types of fires as well.

Class D Rated

Class D Rated Fire Extinguishers are intended to be used on fires involving combustible metals that actually burn, such as: magnesium, sodium, & potassium.

Class K Rated

Class K Rated Fire Extinguishers, the newest type on the market, are specialty extinguishers that are intended to be used on kitchen / deep fryer fires: animal oils, fats, & vegetable oils.

Effectively Use a Fire Extinguisher with the PASS Method

It’s important to use a fire extinguisher rated for the type of fire you’re dealing with, but its just as important to know how to properly use the fire extinguisher. There are (4) basic step to properly use a portable fire extinguisher. However people often panic when seeing a fire and forget what to do. To help remember the (4) basic steps of using a fire extinguisher, just remember P A S S.

  • P. Pull the pin out of the handle pass
  • A. Aim the nozzle at the base of the fire
  • S. Squeeze the handle to discharge the fire extinguisher
  • S. Sweep from side to side to help cover all the burning material

Do’s & Don’ts

  • Maintain a safe escape path
  • Retreat immediately if conditions get out of control
  • Watch for flare-ups afterwards
  • Beware of slippery floors
  • Watch for unstable structures and objects
  • Recharge ALL used extinguishers

OSHA Regulations

In closing, proper fire extinguisher use isn’t just something that’s good to plan for, but necessary to keep employers and employees safe. It is also both required and regulated by OSHA and as such should become part of your OSHA safety plan at work.

While there are many standards for a variety of industries regulated by OSHA, the primary regulations for construction and general industry are found in two sections that we think would be beneficial to leave you with.

1926.150

The employer shall be responsible for the development of a fire protection program to be followed throughout all phases of the construction and demolition work, and he shall provide for the firefighting equipment as specified in this subpart. As fire hazards occur, there shall be no delay in providing the necessary equipment.

1910.157

Where the employer has provided portable fire extinguishers for employee use in the workplace, the employer shall also provide an educational program to familiarize employees with the general principles of fire extinguisher use and the hazards involved with incipient stage fire fighting.” Hands on experience using actual fires in a controlled environment is not required in your particular case.

Get a Grip on the Cold by Choosing the Correct Gloves

With winter right around the corner, its time to start thinking about getting a high quality pair of cold weather gloves. If you work with your hands on a daily basis in potentially cold environments a good pair of gloves will soon become your best friend. Keeping your hands warm and dry are very important in order to be able to use your hands as effectively as possible. Cold and wet conditions can lead to numb fingers and in extreme cases, prolonged exposure can lead to nerve damage or even frostbite.  With these dangers looming as winter weather approaches, gloves are undeniably one of the most import pieces of personal protection equipment that you’ll need this winter. Read on to learn more about 2 different styles of Cold Weather Gloves that we offer here at TannerBolt.com. One option will provide you with economical cold weather protection, while the other will provide you with maximum protection from the cold as well as, all the other hazards on the jobsite.

Cold Weather Glove Choices at Tanner

PowerGrab™ Thermo Hi-Vis Seamless Knit Gloves with Latex MicroFinish Grip

When looking for an economical choice of cold weather gloves, the PowerGrab™ Thermo Hi-Vis Seamles Knit Gloves are a great choice. The seamless construction allows for full dexterity and provides a comfortable skin like fit. These gloves have excellent thermal insulation and quickly evaporate moisture from the skin leaving your hands warm and dry. The latex MicroFinish coating provides superior grip in both dry and wet conditions, making these gloves the perfect choice for a number of different applications. The PowerGrab™ Thermo Seamless Knit Gloves are widely used in refrigerated areas, utilities, food processing, commercial fishing, construction, outdoor winter activities and recreation. Get your hands on a pair of PowerGrab™ Thermo Hi-Vis Seamles Knit Gloves today at TannerBolt.com.PowerGrab™ Thermo Gloves

Product Features:

  • Seamless construction for a comfortable fit
  • 10 Gauge
  • Acrylic gloves provide economical cold weather protection
  • Latex MicroFinish coating provides a superior grip in dry and wet conditions by reacting like tiny suction cups that attach themselves firmly to the material being handled
  • Knit wrist helps prevent dirt and debris from entering the glove
  • Hi-Vis coloring makes this product very easy to see
  • Excellent thermal insulation
  • Quickly evaporates moisture from the skin
  • Extra softness for non-chafing comfort
  • Launderable for extended life and to reduce replacement costs
  • Cotton color binding denotes sizing
  • Hi-Vis Orange or Hi-Vis Lime Green

 

Maximum Safety® Mad Max™ Thermo Gloves

If you are looking for a pair of gloves that will not only protect you from the winter weather, but also from the bumps and bruses of the jobsite, look no further than the Maximum Safety® Mad Max™ Thermo Gloves. With Thermo Plastic Rubber molded fingers, thumb, and back of the hand guards, as well as additional foam padded knuckles, these gloves provide you with maximum protection. Mad Max™ Thermo Gloves are constructed with 3M™ Thinsulate™ lining providing superior insulation and a HIPORA® liner that is waterproof, windproof, and breathable all at the same time. These gloves provide you with the protection typical gloves can’t making them great for petrochemical, heavy/light construction, auto repair, demolition, manufacturing, mining, fabrication, and landscaping. Get your hands on the Maximum Safety® Mad Max™ Thermo Gloves at TannerBolt.com now!

Product Features:Mad Max™ Thermo Gloves

  • Synthetic leather palm enhances grip in dry and light oil applications while providing dexterity
  • PVC sandy grip on palm and fingertips provides an enhanced grip and extra cut/abrasion resistance
  • 3M™ Thinsulate™ lining provides superior insulation without the bulk of fleece
  • HIPORA® liner is waterproof, windproof and breathable all at the same time and will keep hands dry and comfortable
  • Foam laminated spandex fabric back for comfort and breathability
  • Thermo Plastic Rubber (TPR) molded finger, thumb and back hand guards for maximum protection
  • Reinforced thumb crotch for extended glove life, enhanced comfort, increased abrasion resistance and added durability in a high-wear area
  • Foam padded knuckles for added protection
  • Airprene wrist is made with breathable neoprene for comfort
  • Vented lycra fabric to keep your hands cool
  • Synthetic leather upper and heavy lycra fabric bottom fourchettes enhance the natural contour of the glove for a better fit
  • Hi-Vis coloring and reflective back makes this product very easy to see
  • Launderable for extended life and to reduce replacement costs

Stay Warm and Combat Cold Stress

Employers Helping to Prevent Cold Stress

OSHA does not have a specific set of standards in regards to working in cold environments. BUT employers have the responsibility to provide their workers with a place of employment that is free of recognized hazards, including cold stress, which can cause death or serious injury as per (Section 5(a)(1) of the Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970).

Warm Drink Worker

According to OSHA employers should train their workers on the hazards of the job and train them on the correct safety measures to help protect the workers’ safety and health. Some of the guidelines OSHA expects employers to follow include: Employers should train workers on how to recognize cold stress illness & injuries and how to apply first aid treatment. Worker should be trained on the appropriate engineering control, personal protective equipment, and work practices to reduce the risks of cold stress. Employers should provide engineering controls, such as radiant heaters and work areas that are shielded from drafts and/or wind. Employers should use safe work practices to help prevent illness & injuries caused by cold weather. Dehydration is still a risk factor in cold weather, warm sweetened liquids should be provided to workers to keep them warm and hydrated. If possible heavy work should be scheduled in the warmest part of the day. Breaks should be offered to workers in warm areas. Safety measures like these should be incorporated into relevant health and safety plans for the workplace.

Always Dress Appropriately for the Weather

Safety Tips for Workers in Cold Environments

  • Your employer should ensure that you know the symptoms of cold stress.
  • Monitor your physical condition and that of your coworkers.
  • Dress properly for the cold.
  • Stay dry in the cold because moisture or dampness, e.g. from sweating, can increase the rate of heat loss from the body.
  • Keep extra clothing (including underwear) handy in case you get wet and need to change.
  • Drink warm sweetened fluids (no alcohol).
  • Use proper engineering controls, safe work practices, and personal protective equipment (PPE) provided by your employer.

Save Big with Tanner’s Early Winter Buy Specials

Fight Cold Stress with Tanner’s Early Winter Buy SpecialsClick Here to Stay Dry & Warm this Winter and Save Big!

Risks Factors of Working in a Cold Environment

Warning to Outdoor Workers!Cold Stress

If your job requires you to work outdoors in cold environments, you may be at the risk of cold stress. Cold stress can be encountered in a number of different work environments if the proper steps are not taken to prevent it. Read on to learn more about the dangers OSHA warns workers about cold stress and how it can affect your health & safety, as well as steps you can take to prevent cold stress.

Is it Too Cold?

Weather described as “Extreme Cold” can vary across different areas of the country. But in every case, even areas exposed to cold weather for most of the year, workers must take the proper steps to acclimate and combat the cold. Cold temperatures forces the body to work harder to keep itself warm. When wind is thrown into the mix, Wind Chill is another factor workers must take into consideration while working in cold environments. Wind Chill is a combination of air temperature and wind speed, if the air temperature is 40°F and the wind speed is 35 mph, the exposed skin on your body will feel the effects as if the temperature was 28°F.

Cold Stress Group

Cold stress begins to occur when the skin temperature drops and the internal core body temperature begins to go below normal levels. Cold stress can lead to serious health problem, tissue damage, and even death in certain situations. When your body is exposed to cold environments, the body will begin to shift blood flow from the extremities (hands, feet, arms & legs) and the outer skin to the core (chest & abdomen). Once this shifts begins to occur, the exposed skin and extremities will begin to cool rapidly and increase the risk of frostbite and hypothermia. If  you work in wet environments, trench foot is a possible looming problem you will have to look out for.

Risk Factors Contributing to Cold Stress According to OSHA
Cold Stress Surveyor

  • Wetness/dampness, dressing improperly, and exhaustion
  • Predisposing health conditions such as hypertension, hypothyroidism, and diabetes
  • Poor physical conditioning

Most Common Cold Induced Illnesses & Injuries

Hypothermia – When the normal body temperature 98.6°F, drops below 95°F and body heat is lost faster than it can be replaced. Typically hypothermia occurs in Extreme Cold temperature, but hypothermia can also occur at cool temperatures (above 40°F) when a person is chilled from rain, sweat, or submersed in cold water.

Frostbite – As the temperature drops, frostbite can occur and cause an injury to the body that is caused by freezing of the skin and underlying tissues. Frostbite is most likely to affect the exterminates, particularly feet & hands. In severe cases, amputation my be required.

Trench Foot – As refereed to immersion foot, is cause by prolonged exposure to cold and wet environments. Trench foot can occur in both cool and cold conditions. Non-freezing injuries can occur at temperatures as high as 60°F because wet feet lose heat 25X faster than dry feet. The body tries to prevent heat loss by constricting the blood vessels, shutting down circulation to the feet. When this happens, skin tissue begins to die due to the lack of oxygen & nutrients and the buildup of toxic products.

Combating Cold Stress

Check back soon for our next blog post about the proper steps to combat cold stress while working in cold environments.